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Item 
419
  Joe Paonessa here... Something good has happened to me! ... 5/07  
418
  Carving Chips..... Acumulaci髇 Del Rancho De las Monta馻s
417
  Carving Chips..... Summer 2007 BoTales Is Progressing!
416
  Coin Carving Software Discussion −from “The Engraver's Caf” ... 5/07  
415
  Man of Many Marks −by Johnny Ray Huston  
414
  This may well be an all-time record price for a first carving by a new carver! ... 5/07  
413
  The Heart And Soul Of OHNS Is Its People! ... 5/07  
412
  Carving Chips..... Spare any change? Canada Unveils C$1 Million Coin
411
  “Westbound” ~ A Documentary Film ... 5/07  
410
Railway Renegades: Despite the real perils, train-hopping is catching on again −by Leonie Sherman
409
  Mississippi Hobo Jungle −by Sarah Ledbetter ... 5/07  
408
  Carving Chips..... The Nickel is but a Canvas to the Imagination
407
  Bill (Jameson) Zach Hobo Nickel Carvings Archive of available scans as of 5/1/2007 ... 5/07  
406
  Accent: In search of Hobo graffiti ~ Riding the rails Opinion by Bonnie Henry  
405
  Carving Chips..... Steve Cox Shows V-Dubya His Personal Collection
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
404
  Carving a Subject on a 2007 Washington Dollar −by William Jameson ... 4/07  
403
  Persistence Pays Off! −by Cinco de Arturo ... 4/07  
402
  A Different Breed of Freight-Hoppers −by Pamela LiCalzi O'Connell  
401
  Carving Chips..... James Olivencia's “Riding The Eternal Rails” a Tribute to A-No.1
  400  
400
  Fran's Hobo Page ~ Fran DeLorenzo ~ “The Hobo Minstrel” ... 4/07  
399
  Carving Chips..... “Gang of Four” Solid Gold • More Derek Pegnall “Limey” Carvings
398
  Hopping Freight Trains in the Twilight of Hobo Tradition −by Stephen Holden  
397
  Carving Chips..... “Hobo Phasmid” Finds Home in Northern Minnesota
396
  “Ad Astra Per Aspera” ~ Carving Nickels in the Kansa Territories ... 4/07  
395
  Carving Chips..... Recently Engraved Pennies
394
  Train Tags: Beyond Hobo −by Sam Caplan  
393
  Hobo Jungle ...a Short Story by William Manchee ... 4/07  
392
  Mama Jo's Tracks ~ The Danville Girl −by Mama Jo LeCount ... 4/07  
391
  Riders of the Rails −by Holly Dohrn  
390
  About Railroad Spike Knives −by Ray Rantanen ... 4/07  
389
  159,063 Railroad Photos and Counting! www.RailPictures.Net ... 4/07  
388
  A Study into Hobo Literature −by Nial Anderson  
387
  “Riding The Rails” −by Errol Lincoln Uys 4/07  
386
  Carving Chips..... William Jameson • Nickel Carver Extraordinaire
385
  The Hobo Is Dead. Long Live the Hobo. −by Alex Brand  
384
  Industrial Workers of the World “Little Red Songbook” ... 4/07  
383
  The Adolph Vandertie Collection of Tramp Art Ashwaubenon Historical Museum ... 4/07  
382
  The American Hobo −by Colin Beesley  
381
  Carving Chips..... Several Days Spent Building HTML Searches
380
  A Four-Pack from “The California Kid” −by Peter Hoffman ... 4/07  
379
  Mama Jo's Tracks ~ Hit the road Jack! −by Mama Jo LeCount ... 4/07  
378
  Carving Chips..... Grandpa Dudley with Mad Mary
377
  Carving Chips..... Everywhere I look I see potential carved nickels!
376
  Carving Chips..... What People Did For Amusement Before They Had T-V's
375
  Carving Chips..... “The Cat in the Hat” looks pretty good for being 50 years old!
374
  Restroom etching may have been done by famed hobo −by Elo韘a Ruano Gonz醠ez ... 4/07  
Continue reading older TABLE OF CONTENTS for OHNS NEWS items in our SCRAPBOOK
419 
Click to view enlarged version
30 May 2007
Joe Paonessa here...
This is just a short note to let you know something good has happened to me! The American Numismatic Association has a summer seminar program in Colorado Springs each summer. Part of the program includes a two year scholarship - one week each summer - for an engraving program. It is fully paid for, but requires submission
of previous engraving or artwork to be considered.
Well... I submitted, they considered, and I won! I'm still not sure if this means
they think my work is really good... or they think I need more training, but hey,
I'm going to Colorado Springs for a week on their dime! ~ Joe Paonessa
THE ART OF ENGRAVING, ANA Summer Seminar, Colorado Springs, Colorado
June 30 - July 6, 2007 and June 28 July 4, 2008
SIX FULL SCHOLARSHIPS WERE AVAILABLE FOR THIS ONE-OF-A-KIND CLASS TO TEACH AND PROMOTE THE VANISHING ART OF ENGRAVING UNDERWRITTEN BY THE GILROY AND LILIAN P. ROBERTS FOUNDATION
The Art of Engraving is a two-week (one week per year) seminar offered by the American Numismatic Association and fully underwritten by the Gilroy and Lilian P. Roberts Foundation. Mr. Roberts, a renowned engraver and artist, was the 9th Chief Engraver of the United States Mint and chairman of the board of the forerunner of the Franklin Mint.
Here is an active link to ANA抯 flyer giving the full details
www.money.org/Content/NavigationMenu/NumismaticEvents/SummerSeminar/Art_Of_Engraving_Flyer.pdf
Click to read this news item

  Carving Chips.....   • A Year In The Makin'  
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Nathaniel 'Nate' Hawthorne Robert 'Smokie Bob' Brume Prairie Lawyer Jeanne d'Arc
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The Other Guy Mkinda Ellie Chakavu Ellie
Exquisite Nickel Carvings by Joe Paonessa
Most photographs can be left-clicked on to view an enlargement.
418 
  Carving Chips.....   • Acumulaci髇 Del Rancho De las Monta馻s •  
Click to view enlarged version
Enlargements...     Jose'19     Angel'20     Juan'20     Diego'29     Carlos'30     Jesus'34     Xavier'35     Antonio'35     Miguel'35     Alejandro'35
Jorge'36     Eduardo'36     Cristian'36     Francisco'36     Ricardo'36     Cesar'36     Javier'36     Fernando'36     Mario'36     Leonardo'37
Marco'37     Josue'37     Sergio'37     Roberto'37     Pedro'37     Julio'37     Rafael'37     Marcos'37     Raul'37     Maria'37
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Amaaqtuq Aanaruaba Tuvaaq
Three Ellsworth “Real People” carvings accompanied the “Highlands Ranch Hoard” on its trip to the Kansa Territories.
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Most photographs can be left-clicked on to view an enlargement.
417 
  Carving Chips.....   • Summer 2007 BoTales Is Progressing! •  
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I generated these graphics while creating this header and just had to share them with all y'all! ~ V-Dubya
Most photographs can be left-clicked on to view an enlargement.
416 
9 May 2007
Coin Carving Software Discussion
−from “The Engraver's Caf
   Degs... Just found this today... Virtual Sculptor VS3D/VScad3 SoftwareClick to visit this website carving/engraving software. I think it's output is for a three axis engraving/laser machine. The demo version has the output disabled, but it will print. Nickel carvers or any one having a go at bas-relief may find it useful. I'm still playing...good fun!
   Monk... I have a need to hold onto some of the primordial skills. Machines can earn you quick bucks- but they can't deliver the fun and joy of doing some of this stuff by hand. We can all play a stereo- how many can play a harpsichord, a banjo, or a trumpet? Maybe a guitar, a dulcimer, perhaps the minstrel bones? I got a laser, but my nickel is strictly goin' the old way.
   Degs... I'm of the same mind. I prefer creating my chips by hand, but the software would be useful as an aid to viewing. Say.. a photo rendered as a bas relief. Thought it may be a good self teaching aid, free demo just outputs to screen and print. I play lead guitar, for a heavy rock/metal band. Far too loud, wife says I should know better at my age!!!!!
   Crazy Horse... That's an interesting program, but I'd rather do it by hand. There's a certain personal satisfaction from making something out of nothing, using nothing more than your hands and your mind. “Degs” if you have Photo Shop there is a feature that allows you to view any photo in relief and more.
   Steve Adams... There is a place for technology in the world of engraving, but don't worry, it does not replace a true artist and craftsman. Human hands and the brain that guides them can do things that software and 3D engraving machines cannot. Technology is improving, is useful in production, but is not meant to take over a skilled craft such as hand engraving. There is no heart and soul in a computer and although the software engineer, and the Cad-Cam operator possess these qualities, the machine itself does not and is therefore limited.
   No 3D axis can match an unlimited axis of the hand, or the improvising of our brain. Only a human can sit at a bench and select from hundreds of tools at their disposal and know exactly how to use them for a desired effect. 3D machines are in my field and have been for a number of years now. They are bennificial, but it still takes a hand guy to make a design come alive. Even if software and machines ever get that good, there will still be a demand for hand engravers by people who desire true art.
   Swede... I think Degs referenced the software purely as an item of interest, and a curiosity - I don't think he's advocating using it and perhaps trying to pass it off as hand cut. There are two things that reveal machine vs hand... the first is that 98% of machines use either a rotating cutter which leaves telltale tool marks, or a diamond drag. The second is that the lines are too perfect. A computerized straight line is TOO straight. And of course, there's something missing, and that is the soul of the artist who did it by hand.
   I've got a very tight little CNC machine that could easily clean up a hobo nickel field to perfection prior to hand work, but that too would be “cheating,” and even if the machine cut field is perhaps abrasive blasted or otherwise retouched, it'd be detectable due to the perfection (flatness) of the field. I suppose if you were desperate to counterfeit a hand-cut field, you could probably program in very minor and random “errors” for the cutter, just enough to make it look like hand work.
   Again, I think the intent of the post was just a “hey, this is cool software of interest” and not a promotion of computer coin carving as a replacment for hand cutting.
   Steve Adams... I do agree that the software was the point, but it still brings up an interesting aspect of engraving, and one that has actually been debated for several years now. The moment you mention CAD-CAM in my field it brings up some pretty strong emotions one way or another. CAD-CAM probably doesn't relate to the gun and knife engravers very much or at all, is that correct? Die engraving is a big difference in that CAD-CAM is sweeping through the industry. I am happy to report however that a $250,000 software and machine set up is lacking in comparrison to a good hand die engraver. The ironic part is that a hand man is needed to make the computer cut dies cleaner and more detailed. “John Henry” is still the champ. Out of curiosity, how would the gun and knife engravers feel if people started having their work done by by a computer controled machine? I know this isn't likely to happen, just a what if, and sorry for straying off the subject. Computer art programs do amaze me. I just don't like mixing computers and craftsmanship.
   Tom Curran... Some folks won't care HOW their product is made. That's the market to seek if you want to produce work with a machine.
   Handwork is appreciated by those who do it, and by their clientele. I don't think this machinery is a threat to our business.
   I have to say that it's pretty cool stuff. I have a machine shop and a Computer Numerical Control (CNC) Mill, and with the right software, I could do this too. Electronics and machinery have come a long way. Would it be fun? Not as much as hand work.
   Ray Cover... I see it as no different than prototype machining and CNC machining in industry. My father worked for most of his life as a prototype machinist. He is a very exacting and skilled craftsman who has no idea how to even aproach a CNC set up. Each has its advantages.
   My dad can make a one part in about 10% of the time it takes a guy with a CNC set up to do the programing set his tooling up and make the one part.
   However, The guy with the CNC set up can make a 1000 parts in 10% of the time it takes my dad to make 1000 parts.
   Computer engraving is no different. If a customer is looking for a one of a kind gun his best investment and lowest cost is to get a hand engraver. If he wants a 1000 or more identical guns he is better off going to a computer aided set up.
   Another thing to throw into the mix is this. We have discussed on here many times in the past how each individual engraver's work has its own nuances that are very hard for another person to completely replicate. It is even more difficult for an machine to replicate a hand engravers look. I suspect it always will be.
   Steve Adams... Well said Ray!
   Degs... Thanks Swede, couldn't have put t better myself. I just thought some one starting carving might find it useful to see a photo in bas-relief, give them some ideas on cutting... with hand tools... and it's free. I was actually researching the possibility of striking large art medals from my own HANDCUT dies when I came across the software.
   Very nice work Crazy Horse, I prefer hand work, although I have moved to airpower recently.
   I think there's a place for computers etc, alot of people on the forum use them for designing and transfering artwork... Oooooh... now I've done it! I use this technique now, but there is still a lot of occasions when I have to go back to plasticine and french chalk and hand drawing. I don't think a computer controlled machine could follow a line in french chalk????
   Ron Smith... I think you hit the nail square on the head Ray. I think however, it goes even deeper than that. the satisfaction of being self sufficient is one of the basic human desires and means of self esteem. At any time you choose, you could let go of the world of technology and make it on your own. that is really what i think part of it is about, and it is about quality over quantity as well. Artists seem to have a depth about them that the rest of the world can't and doesn't relate to. That sensitivity to simple, original, uncomplicated things that can remain under ones own control is a great sorce of satisfaction ...and that is my contribution and two cents on the subject. One thing machines or men will never reproduce is another mans personality because that is the reflection of ones own individual uniqueness and machines also can never replace the loving touch of the human hand. So be it. Forward!
This interesting discussion occurred on Sam Alfano's “The Engraver's Caf” website. It will continue on after I post this so following
is an active link so you can go check for any more recent thoughts posted on this subject... Coin Carving SoftwareClick to visit this website ~ V-Dubya
Most photographs can be left-clicked on to view an enlargement.
415 
Bill Daniel's Who Is Bozo Texino?
“The Epic Tale of the Improbable Discovery of
the True Identity of the World's Greatest Boxcar Artist.”
Man of Many MarksClick to read this article
−by Johnny Ray Huston for the San Francisco “Bay Guardian”, September 28, 2005
414 
9 May 2007
This may well be an all-time record price for a first carving by a new carver!
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“The Little Gromit” $395 “Crush” $104.25 “Think Tank” $56.66 “Mimicry” $57.50 “Little Fella” $292
   “The Little Gromit” was named for its likeness to my little brother, at an age when he skated with a group that called themselves “The Gromits.” This is my very FIRST Hobo nickel ever. I loved doing it, and as I am an engraver by trade, I will certainly be doing more of them. It is carved on a 1972 nickel, and on the edge initialed, numbered and dated, “JLS #1 4-27-07”
   “Crush” is my second Hobo nickel. A creative creature of my imagination engraved into a nickel to add a little flair to any Hobo nickel collection. The nickel is initialed, numbered and dated along the edge of the coin. “JS #2 5/3/07” ~ John Schipp
   “Think Tank” is the third “JS” Hobo nickel. Johnny is constantly sketching or doodling something. He actually says that drawing helps him pay attention! He sketches on anything that isn't moving and sometimes the kids. He does not consider himself an abstract artist. Call him what you will, but no matter what you call him, you have to admit he is different. These faces, like a lot of his work, just happen as he is working on them. He starts with nothing and just engraves. And ta-da, a masterpiece. And sometimes not. He enjoys tattooing and sketching, but he LOVES engraving. Johnny loves to create. He is a very creative individual and just likes to have fun. After spending all his time at work setting stones, sizing, and engraving high end jewelry he deserves to have a little fun. I know I am his wife! “JS #3 5/5/07”
   “Mimicry” is aptly named for the a way that the face does not instantly stand out, like it is camoflauged with its surrounding. This is my fourth Hobo nickel and like the others it is Initialed, numbered and, dated along its edge.
   “Little Fella” is the first one that I have done on a buffalo nickel. He is initialed, numbered and dated along the edge "JS #5 5/07" ~ John Schipp
   Actually “Crush” sold on eBay a day before “The Little Gromit” due to the listing choices the Seller made. Had it sold second then likely there would have been some “carry over” effect as a result of the astounding final price that “The Little Gromit” realized. Personally I attribute this fantastic sales result to Johnny's originality... these are uniquely his own creations! Nothing even vaguely similar has ever been carved on a nickel before. ~ V-Dubya
Most photographs can be left-clicked on to view an enlargement.
413 
7 May 2007
The Heart And Soul Of OHNS Is Its People!
All of these good folks enjoyed each other's company at FUN2007 in Orlando, Florida during January.
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Other attractions were the ANA Small Traveling Exhibit, the OHNS Annual Auction and the Heritage “Hobo Nickel” Auction.
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Click on photograph to view all three exhibit panels.
Click for an expanded view of all three exhibit panels
From... Gail Baker, Manager of Market and Brand Development, American Numismatic Association
Click to view this anouncement
Click to view this announcement.

As a part of its mission, the ANA Money Museum circulates a
number of small, easily transported traveling exhibits for circulation
to ANA member clubs, museums, schools, libraries, and banks.
The exhibits should be booked at least 6 to 8 weeks
in advance of the exhibit dates.
Loan periods are flexible.
Most photographs can be left-clicked on to view an enlargement.
412 
  Carving Chips.....   • Spare any change? Canada Unveils C$1 Million Coin  
Coin Carver's Dream!
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   A 100kg gold coin is seen next to gold bars and smaller gold coins in an undated publicity photo from the Royal Canadian Mint. The Royal Canadian Mint unveiled a welcome addition to any piggy bank on Thursday, May 3, 2007 -- a monster gold coin with a face value of C$1 million that it says is the world's biggest, purest and highest denomination coin. { Read news release... Click to read this news item }
530mm(21") in diameter, 30mm(1.2") thick,
 weighing 100kg(220.5pounds/3,215TroyOz) and 
worth $2,196,810US @$683.30US per TroyOz.
   Michael Cirelli has this to say... “Please send photo or art of what you would like carved onto it. The final price will depend on the complexity of the project. Your estimated cost will be approximately 125,000 euros. That includes the coin and the labor... but you don't get the chips and it will be in deep relief.”
  Royal Canadian Mint: “A WORLD FIRSTClick to visit this website  
Most photographs can be left-clicked on to view an enlargement.
411 
4 May 2007
Click to visit this websiteClick to visit this website
   A piece of wood, a pocketknife, and nothing but time…
   Hobo art and tramp art were uniquely born of independent spirit. Hobos whittle. Tramps carve. Both craft amazing objects from discarded items and found materials, recycling them into picture frames, jewelry boxes, functional furniture, and enchanting objects of whimsy. And one man, Adolph Vandertie – known as the Grand Duke of Hobos – has created and amassed over 4,000 rare and beautiful pieces of this distinctive folk art form.
   As a child during the Depression, Adolph was captivated by a desire for travel. He frequented the hobo jungles, ate Mulligan Stew, and rode the rails. He was part of a world where freedom-loving men told preposterous stories of adventure and measured the time by whittling.
   Preferring the company of hobos to school, Adolph once watched as a hobo whittled a ball-in-the-cage, the quintessential trademark of a hobo whittler. From that moment, Adolph was hooked, and a lifelong obsession with whittling and collecting took hold.
   At the age of 21, Adolph put his traveling days behind him. His sweetheart Adeline proposed, they were married and began a life of 69 years together. Little did Adeline know that her future home – built piece by piece by Adolph – would also become home to thousands of unique and interesting pieces of tramp and hobo art. A living museum of a dying craft from a dying culture…
   As he grew older, Adolph traded one addiction for another, using whittling as a compulsive form of therapy to battle addictions with alcohol and tobacco – freeing him to create more and more of his unbelievably intricate works of art. The end result is a man who found peace in a sharp blade and a good piece of wood. A man who created incredible works of art – in a way that only the most skilled hand could accomplish.
   At 95 years young, Adolph has faced a lifetime of hardship and heartache, addiction and fascination. Westbound is his story captured as documentary - a story in which unflinching American history and uniquely American art merge.
   This touchingly honest full-length film is the recollection of Adolph’s life and his obsession with preserving a culture he was never fully part of. It celebrates the joy of pure creative expression, and portrays the small and fading light of hobo culture. Its gentle insights strive to uncover how this scarcely educated man recognized the need to preserve the past in the hope of understanding the present.
Most photographs can be left-clicked on to view an enlargement.
410 
Nothing can prepare you
for hopping your first freight train.
Railway Renegades: Despite the real perils, train-hopping is catching on againClick to read this article
−by Leonie Sherman for the San Francisco “Chronicle”, March 26, 2006
409 
2 May 2007

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Mississippi Hobo Jungle
                    −by Sarah Ledbetter, Water Valley, MS, 27 April 2007
Click to read this NEWS item

Click to read this NEWS item
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408 
  Carving Chips.....   • The Nickel is but a Canvas to the Imagination •  {*}
The Engraver's Caf is spawning new nickel carvers!
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Degs Tezash HTandB Harpuahound Steichman
{*} Apologies to Henry David Thoreau who observed that “The world is but a canvas to the imagination.”
Most photographs can be left-clicked on to view an enlargement.
407 
1 May 2007
Bill (Jameson) Zach Hobo Nickel Carvings Click to view Bill's Photo Album
Archive of available scans as of 5/1/2007
These scans are in general but not precise REVERSE chronological order.
Click on any thumbnail scan below to see actual scan.

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This is just a sample of Bill's online Photo Album!   Click Click to view Bill's Photo Album to access the entire album.
Most photographs can be left-clicked on to view an enlargement.
406 
Not all graffiti is done by some punk kid
with an aerosol can aimed at your back wall.

Accent: In search of Hobo graffiti ~ Riding the railsClick to read this article
Opinion by Bonnie Henry, Tucson, Arizona, April 2, 2007
405 
  Carving Chips.....   • Steve Cox Shows V-Dubya His Personal Collection  
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Unknown Press Villarin Shamey Olivencia
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Eye-catching Carved Nickels
from
 Steve Cox's Personal Collection 
Steve has carved his own extraordinary personal pocket pieces!
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404 
29 April 2007
Carving a Subject on a 2007 Washington Dollar
 −by William Jameson ~ OHNS Member #599
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“Stage One”
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“Stage Two”
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“Stage Three”
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“Stage Four”
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“Stage Five”
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“Stage Six”
First: This will be a thread you need to check daily for the steps in carving a subject on a 2007 Washington dollar. Before I start this thread... Please remember I have certain tools that I use and have been using many years and enjoy using, but I'm not promoting tools. I'm just describing what tools I use in carving coins, use the tools you feel best using. The main tools I'll be using are a #36 and a #42 hand push graver [no heel], my gravermax with a monarch handpiece, 3 different grits sanding sticks. Now to the carving of a Washington dollar, it's a lot different from carving a nickel. When I carve a coin, I want it to have a minted look, this means the field has to be smooth, no dips, no grooves, no nicks, and etcetera. The first picture is the host coin before we start to carve it, our subject to be carved will be a BillZach original design I've used on new nickels. We'll call the subject “The Sea Captain.” What we want on our finished coin is a new subject on the coin, but no telltale marks on the field or face that we recarved Washington...
Second: This will be our first step in carving a 2007 Washington dollar. I've applied chinese white on the coin to show my scribe marks, this picture will show you a very roughed out image of the cap brim, cap design, beard, ear, and etcetera. Yours can be different to a degree, but the lines I've scribed will be the ones I cut. Don't start cutting on your coin until you see the next posting later today...
Third: The only tool I've used so far has been a #36 hand push graver with no heel. I've taken my push graver and cut inward to the scribe lines and popped the metal out. We've got the outline of the beard cut, the cap bill, cap brim, bottom of cap behind ear and ear cut. Now this is very important about carving a new dollar, our field next to the subject has to be the same level as the rest of the field, we're going for that mint like field. All you new engravers who only have hand push gravers, you can carve this coin too. It's hard to get a good picture with the bright cuts, but pictures will get better on the next step...
Fourth: Now I've cut the beard, sideburns, and etcetera with my monarch handpiece using a small flat graver. Remember keep the field level as the original field meets the subject. We are now ready to start detailing the cap and face and get the gravers marks out of the field and face. I dulled the coin so you can better view the cuts I make since last picture. It's about 50% completed at this point...
Fifth: The coin carving is about 75% completed. I've added some texture to the bill on the cap, cut some seams in cap, added crowfeet on eyes and worked on field. Now I need to give it a few finishing touches, sandblast it and give it a uniform color to everything and it's finished...
Sixth: It's finished, I changed the cap design a little, cleaned the field up some more, added lines in collar area, sandblasted and added aging to coin. I'm getting a reflection from the light around the eyes, so forgive my picture taking...
Most photographs can be left-clicked on to view an enlargement.
403 
28 April 2007
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Persistence Pays Off !
 I t has been a thirteen year pursuit for this nickel.  Back in “94” I met an antique dealer who told me he had some hobos, and of course they weren't for sale.  Every time I saw this dealer, which is and was twice a year, I would ask him about them. Finally he agreed to show and sell me this one.  He also vowed to let me have the rest, as he finds them.
 P ersistence pays off... also showing him my collection made him understand that I truly had a passion for these treasures.  In the end he told me this one should be in the collection of someone who is inspired and enthusiastic about them.
Cinco de Arturo, OHNS Member #552 and Active Nickel Carver
Most photographs can be left-clicked on to view an enlargement.
402 
Real hobos don't use cellular phones.
Recreational hobos, however, ...
... are an increasingly wired breed.
The New York Times, August 20, 1998
A Different Breed of Freight-HoppersClick to read this article  −by Pamela LiCalzi O'Connell

401 
  Carving Chips.....   • James Olivencia's “Riding The Eternal Rails” a Tribute to A-No.1   Click to EMail this person.
This design is called a “Celtic Knot.” This design is called a “Celtic Knot.” Click to view an enlargement of this photograph. Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.

400 
27 April 2007
Fran's Hobo Page Click to visit this website  ~  Fran DeLorenzo  ~  “The Hobo Minstrel”
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
The Texas Madman's 1998 Pennsburg Gathering Tapestry
   This tapestry was made by “The Texas Madman” and was displayed at the 1998 Pennsburg Gathering. Madman raffled it off there and I was the lucky winner, to the dismay of many who would have liked to have been able to take it home. It's now hanging on my office wall and every visitor, to my house, is hustled in to admire it. The quality of these pictures don't do Madman's tapestry justice. The tapestry is made up of various sized pieces of denim and the stitching is a short history of Madman's 25 years of life on the road and shows the symbols of some of the roads he's ridden.

Ohio Tom's Railroad Spike Train Whistles and Door Knockers
   Art comes in various forms and the following pictures not only shows artistic talent but also the versatility of today's Hobo Craftsmen. Anybody can make a wooden whistle but “Ohio Tom” makes these train whistles from actual railroad spikes and gets a fine quality sound.
   This door knocker is also made by that “poor midwestern boy” Ohio Tom. It's made from a slice of old railroad track and a spike. Decorative, as well as useful... both this and the whistle show the talent that many Hoboes have. Just goes to prove that you can be artistic and creative even if you've never had no formal book larnin.
   Anyone wanting to obtain either of these unique railroad spike creations can just EMail me and I'll put you in touch with Ohio Tom. ~ Fran DeLorenzo ~ “The Hobo Minstrel” ~ Click to EMail Fran. ~ Fran's Hobo Page Click to visit this website
Check out Fran's Hobo Art Click to visit this website webpage for more interesting artistic creations! ~ V-Dubya
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399 
  Carving Chips.....   •Gang of Four” Solid Gold • More Derek Pegnall “Limey” Carvings •  
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  PostScript.....   • The Adventure Continues •  
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I am pleased you got Thor's hammer “Mjolnir” portrayed so faithfully.  Yet there is something missing his chariot drawn by the goats Tanngrisnir and Tanngnj髎tr and his mistress J醨nsaxa! •  He looks a lot like Torbj鰎n Ekendahl our local butcher when I was a lad.  He went by 揟hor because of the humongous hammer he carried with him that he used to stun hogs and cattle with before he took them apart with his Bowie knife. •  In his later years... Thor, his hammer and his knife were 慶olor for a series of failed Rock Bands.  He was quoted as saying that his pinash and personal magnetism couldn抰 make up for their lack of talent. •  The Sheriff took his knife away from him after he retired because he was scaring the local bar patrons on a regular basis.  Thor refused to give up his hammer and the Sheriff couldn抰 find any local ordinances that carrying a hammer violated.  The whole town turned out to see Thor buried with his hammer when he finally hit the road for Valhalla, “Hall of the slain.” •  There really isn抰 anything I can see that would improve this carving (other than including a couple goats and an easy woman!) V-Dubya
  Previous News Item #375.....   • The Cat in the Hat” looks pretty good for being 50 years old! Click to read this NEWS item •  
  Previous News Item #370.....   • I'm Hooked! −by Derek Carl Pegnall, Harrogate, United Kingdom Click to read this NEWS item •  
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398 
The scruffy, outspoken train-hoppers in Sarah George's
exhilarating documentary, “Catching Out,” are a sure sign that the
pioneer spirit still flickers in pockets of TV-wired America, especially
in the Pacific Northwest, where much of the movie was filmed.

The New York Times, August 20, 2003
Hopping Freight Trains in the Twilight of Hobo TraditionClick to read this article  −by Stephen Holden
397 
  Carving Chips.....   •Hobo Phasmid” Finds Home in Northern Minnesota •  
phas穖id n. Any of various insects of the order Phasmida, including the leaf insects and walking sticks.
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He wanted to be a bindle stick and travel the world!
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
   A long long time ago, in a magic land far far away called Idaho, near a river and a railroad track, lived a young pine tree. Ever since he was a small pine cone living with his mother, he had heard the stories of travel and adventure told between the passing hobo's bindle sticks. No wonder that at a very young age he had decided that a bindle stick is what he wanted to be more than anything else in this world. More than a 2x12 header, or a fancy piece of molding, he wanted to be a bindle stick and travel the world!
   As luck would have it, one day a stranger came down the trail with a bow saw, and somehow our small pine knew this was his chance, he held his breath, and stood as straight and tall as he could. The man stopped, looked, paused, and then sawed him off both top and bottom. He then took the little pine home, peeled his bark and let him dry. About now our little pine was wondering if he had made a mistake, and did he really wanted to live his life as a stick, but as he dried he felt stronger. Sure, he couldn't bend like he used to, but he didn't have to because now he was lighter and stronger, and knew he couldn't be in better condition.
   His new master must have realized it also, because he took our little pine, and with a knife gave him eyes to see with, a nose to smell with, and a mouth and ears, so that he too could tell and listen to the many new stories, but, the most wonderful thing the man did was to give him a beautiful new bowler hat to keep that damn rain off his head.
   I don't know how many stories will be told, but I do know our new bindle stick has a good home, in northern Minnesota, where he will be treated with the respect he deserves, and we will try to keep him supplied with stories as well as letting people know his heritage. ~ Cliff Kraft ~ 19 April 2007
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396 
18 April 2007
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Tezera Ashagari
First “Tez” Nickel
Second “Tez” Nickel
Third “Tez” Nickel
Ad Astra Per Aspera” ~ Carving Nickels in the Kansa Territories
M
y name is Tezera Ashagari. I live in Shawnee, Kansas. I am married and father of two kids, five years old and one year old. I am hand engraver, I have been engraving on metals for twenty years. The past twenty years I engrave on and off, because I was living in apartment and have no place to set up my engraving bench and tools. Other than space problem, I still have time problem. I have a full time job to work like everybody else and a family responsibility to work in the house. However, even the time is too tight and the place is not comfortable, I have been doing my engravings on and off. Now my problem for space is solved, I have my own house and the basement is my shop. About the time problem, I am taking a time from my bed time and weekends.
I
am a member of many engraving forums. I post my engraving practice plate on the forums to hear comments from my engraver friends. One day as usual when I post my three dimensional practice work, many engravers commented my work is beautiful and good for coin carving. This was the moment I consider to carve Hobo Nickel. One of the engravers, Internationaly Collected Goldsmith/Designer Robert Shamey, looked my work and to his kindness sent me three full horn buffalo nickels and advised me to carve Hobo nickels.
I
carved my first hobo nickel and posted on ebay, as a result, I was overwhelmed with the output and couldn抰 believe my eyes. It was sold for $228. My second, third, and fourth, all are sold with good prices. I found engraving Hobo nickels fun and interesting more than any other engraving for many reasons. First it is one way to get source of income, second it is a way for me to have fun and escape my long days by making my self busy and third it is my other practice plate while I am improving my skill.
W
hat makes different engraving Hobo Nickel from other engraving for me is, the material, Buffalo Nickel. The material is soft and small Nickel and it is pre carved. It needs to be altered and in some cases needs to be erased to carve my own design. I have to consider which part of my design is matching with the figure on the nickel. I also have to prepare my own tools to do specific part of the design because of its small size.
I
n this new art, my priority is to produce quality work and satisfy my customers need. Currently I am receiving commission from customers on ebay. I hope my quality would keep up as I engrave more hobo nickels and got more experience. If you have any questions, please EMail me. Thank you very much. Tez
Tezera Ashagari ••• Click to EMail Tez. ••• Wednesday, April 18, 2007
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395 
  Carving Chips.....   • Recently Engraved Pennies •  
The Engraver's Caf 2007 Penny Carving Contest... Plus
Darren Reeves
Professional
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Only Entry
Mike Cirelli
Advanced
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
31 votes • 45%
Amy Armstrong
Advanced
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
18 votes • 26%
Bob Shamey
Advanced
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
15 votes • 22%
Steve Cox
Advanced
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
5 votes • 7%

Bill Jameson
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Bill Jameson
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Submitted by Contest Deadline
Plus... (not submitted)
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394 
Train Tag: a visual moniker containing a simple
picture, signature, date, and optional words, drawn
onto the side of a boxcar, usually with chalk or ink.

Train Tags: Beyond HoboClick to read this article  −by Sam Caplan
393 
14 April 2007
Click to read this short story
                                                            ...a Short Story by William Manchee
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
   The Ventura County Fair was by far the extravaganza of the year for all of us kids. As summer came to a close and the school year was upon us, we couldn't help but anticipate our most cherished holiday, Fair Day. Historically on the first Monday of October every year a huge parade marched down Main Street marking the commencement of the fair which lingered for 14 glorious days.
   The Fair Grounds were located on the Pacific Ocean directly south of the mouth of the Ventura River. The main Southern Pacific Railway line stretching from San Diego to Seattle abutted to the east. Two long train bridges spanned the Ventura River. Between the two bridges there was a grove of majestic Eucalyptus trees that provided temporary housing for the bums and hobos that rode the Southern Pacific freight trains up and down the California coast. We called it Hobo Jungle. The only way to get to Hobo Jungle from Ventura was over the railroad bridges.
Continue reading this short story
FantasticFiction> Authors M> William Manchee Click to visit Fantastic Fiction's website     Author William Manchee Click to visit William Manchee's website     BitBooks.com Fiction Guide Click to visit BitBooks.com Fiction Guide's website     Copyright William Manchee
Stan Turner Mysteries: Undaunted (97) • Brash Endeavor (98) • Second Chair (00) • Cash Call (03) • Deadly Distractions (04)
Black Monday (05) • Cactus Island (06) • Act Normal (07)   Richard Coleman Mysteries: Death Pact (99) • Plastic Gods (03)
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392 
12 April 2007
###  Mama Jo's Tracks  ###
“The Danville Girl”
Danville Girl
My pocket book was empty
My heart was full of pain
Ten thousand miles away from home
Bumming the railroad train
It was standing on the platform
Smoking a cheep cigar
listening for that next freight train
To carry an empty car
Well I got off at Danville
Got stuck on the Danville girl
You bet your life she's out of sight
She wore those Danville curls
She took me in her Kitchen
She treated me nice and kind
She got me in the notion
Of bumming all the time
She wore her hair on the back of her head
Like high-tone people do
But the very next train come down the line
I bid that girl adieu
I pulled my cap down over my eyes
Walked down to the track
Then I caught a westbound freight
Never did look back
Version: Woody Guthrie
Lyrics courtesy of BluegrassLyrics.Com!
   I bought a CD of a very well know Hobo singer. The CD is produced and sold by Cookie Man Music Company. This singer has several CD抯 for sale but one song in particular I want to talk about. The song is called, “The Danville Girl.” This is what the singer has to say about this song:
   It has been great fun to introduce this song by telling the audience that, just as most towns have a Main Street, most states have a Danville. (Particularly, when I am in a state where there is a Danville.)
   It would be really neat, to visit every Danville in the county and have my picture taken next to the city limit sign. Better still, to one day find that Danville Girl. You have to be careful what you wish for though.
   Not that long ago, I played up in Craftbury, Vermont. How was I to know it was only a few miles from Danville? After the set, I was invited by two comely women, from Danville, to come and see their town. Not one, but two! I don抰 think I can handle that.
   Did you know the famous hobo singer; Frank Koehl抯 hobo moniker is Danville Dan? Did you know a National Hobo Queen is from Danville, Illinois? She is a graduate from Danville High School as well as several famous celebrities such as Dick and Jerry VanDyke, Donald O扖onnor and Gene Hackman.
   There is another very famous person in the hobo history that owned a flop house in Danville, Illinois. The National Hobo Convention was held one year in Danville, Illinois before it started in Britt, Iowa.
   The famous hobo who is from Danville, Illinois is Onion Cotton. The Britt hobo logo is thought to be Tourist Union 63 President Onion Cotton. Onion Cotton is the hobo who agreed to bring the convention to Britt in 1900. (From the Hobo Guide.)
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
   One hundred and three years after Onion Cotton and Charles Noe brought the National Hobo Convention to Britt, Iowa Mama Jo was elected the National Hobo Queen in 2003.
   Larry Penn, known as 揅ream City Slim is the famous hobo singer who sings the song “The Danville Girl.” Remember I told you he wrote “Better still, to one day find that Danville Girl.” Well, Larry you found her as a 2003/2004 Hobo Queen, Mama Jo from Danville, Illinois. This is coincidentally but my favorite food is, yeah you got it “onion.”
   Hobo Santa is from Danville, Illinois too. We were high school sweet hearts and have been married forty-six years but have been sweethearts for fifty-one years. ~ Hoboically, (hugs) Mama Jo, “The Danville Girl”
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391 
A hobo is a man who will work when he can get it, at a
decent wage, but insists upon the right to beat his way from
town to town to better his condition... men of character,
not yeggs, crooks or bums.
~ Jeff Davis, King of the Hobos, 1913
Riders of the RailsClick to read this article  −by Holly Dohrn
390 
12 April 2007
About Railroad Spike Knives
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.  Twisted Railroad Spike Knife
The twisted portion of the HC railroad spike forms the handle for this unique knife. The blade is 4 3/4" and the knife is 8 3/4" overall.
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.  Ironwood Railroad Spike Knife
A high carbon railroad spike knife with an ironwood handle. The blade is 4 3/4" and the knife is 8 3/4" overall.
   My first spike knife was made in the summer of 1990. It was made as a lark and turned out to be more than expected. After hardening and tempering, the blade would shave hair and cut through steel rivets by pounding on the back with a hammer and still remained shaving sharp. Many experiments were performed to determine the best quenching medium for hardening and the tempering colors that gave the best edge.
   The goal was to make a reasonably priced knife that would perform as well as higher priced knives and was unique. Currently old spikes are used that show a particular spark when ground that definitely is not mild steel. The railroad spikes used are high in carbon near .55 to .6%. Spikes with the designation HC somewhere on the head have the high carbon content. These were typically used on curves and switch yards where a tougher spike was required.
   After shaping and grinding, the blade is normalized then heated to a hardening temperature and quenched in quenching oil. The temper is achieved by applying heat to the back of the blade and letting the oxidation colors advance towards the cutting edge. At the first hint of yellow oxidation near the edge the blade is cooled in water.
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.  Unorthodox BBQ Railroad Spike Knife
A very different knife made from a high carbon railroad spike. The blade is 5" and the knife is 13" overall.
The result is a knife that is hard on the cutting edge and softer in the back and handle area. The cutting edge has tested at a Rockwell C scale hardness of 58 to 59 and the blade back and tang at 40.
   The finished product is available in many blade styles. Laminated Birch wood slabs or elk and deer antler attached on each side of the handle with the spike head polished to a bright luster makes an attractive knife. Popular styles are trailing point, drop point, skinners, Clip point and fillet/boning knives. The head of the spike on the end of the handle is great for cleaning the blood along the backbone of large fish. It also allows a positive grip when drawing the knife from the sheath.
   The sheaths are made by sewing along the blade edge with a welt in between to keep the blade from hitting the stitching. They are all hand stitched from 9-10 ounce vegetable tanned leather.
   Small narrow gauge or mine rail spikes make excellent neck knives. These small knives can be worn on a thong around the neck or on a belt. The popular blade shapes are a straight point, drop point or a trailing point. These also make an excellent belt buckle knife.
   The total package is an affordable, durable, unique knife of almost any blade shape. They make a good backup knife for skinning or other unique applications or make a good everyday knife that performs well. Reports indicate they out perform many commercial knives for sharpness, edge holding and ease of sharpening the convex ground blade.
   The knives shown in my catalog are the more popular styles. I make many more styles depending on the desires of the buyer.
   Handle choices vary from antler to natural woods and the very beautiful laminated birch. If desired the handle can be made by twisting the spike and polishing instead of laminating handle materials on the sides of the flattened area. Write, call, fax or email if you have questions or a special request.  { Visit Ray's website, link provided below, for contact details. ~ V-Dubya }
   I have been forging iron, steel and knives since 1974. My products are different than most you will encounter. My doctorate degree in physics from Washington State University has helped immensely in understanding the complex task of forging, hardening and tempering steel. ~ Ray Rantanen
www.raysknives.com Click to visit Ray Rantanen's website Click to view Ray Rantanen's items for sale on eBay
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389 
11 April 2007
159,063 Railroad Photos and Counting!
“Ease of Access” is the KEY!
You can have all the resources in the world but if you can't easily retrieve the item(s) you are interested in then they do you no good what-so-ever.
The non-subscription version of this website buries its functionality in banner advertisements but everything works. The results are fantabulous!
Their Railroad Photo Search Engine is the BEST I have ever encountered. It shows obviously careful planning and forethought which makes it both intuitive and really easy to use.
The “care and feeding” of a database is always the largest resource hog. This website solves that difficulty by drawing on the public at large to add photos to www.RailPictures.NetClick to visit the www.RailPictures.Net website which are accumulating at a really astounding rate... in excess of 1,000 a week at this writing.
Overall a SUPERLATIVE resource!
Functional Searchs
Newest Additions
People's Choice
Most Popular
of all time
of last 24 hours
of last 48 hours
of last week
of last two weeks
of last 30 days
Categories
Bridges/Trestles
Derailments
In-Cab Photos
Night Shots
Passenger Trains
Snow Shots
Special Schemes
Stations/Terminals
Steam Locomotive
Street Running
Towers
Tunnel Photos
Yards
− Reviewed by V-Dubya
Click to visit the www.RailPictures.Net website
Non-functional Screen Shot of www.RailPictures.Net's Search Engine
Postscript: I have not throughly researched the different "Railroad Photos" websites available online but I did stumble over www.RRPictureArchives.net with 639,549 photos available online. Not to throw rocks at them... I am sure they have worked hard on their website design ...but I found their interface difficult to use requiring multiple new pages as one drills down to a subset of photos only to find that none of them are what you were looking for. ~ V-Dubya
388 
In reality, the hobo was a by-product of the
rapid industrialization of the country in the half-century
beginning at the close of the Civil War.
~ Sarah White
A Study into Hobo LiteratureClick to read this article  −by Nial Anderson
387 
10 April 2007
Riding The Rails”   −by Errol Lincoln Uys
Riding The Rails: Teenagers on the Move During the Great Depression Click to visit this webpage
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
   At the height of the Great Depression, two hundred and fifty thousand teenage hoboes were roaming America. Some left home because they felt they were a burden to their families; some fled homes shattered by the shame of unemployment and poverty. Some left because it seemed a great adventure. With the blessing of parents or as runaways, they hit the road and went in search of a better life.
   Public perceptions of the road kids differed. There were people who saw the American pioneer spirit embodied in the young wanderers. There were others who feared them as the vanguard of an American rabble potentially as dangerous as the young Fascists then on the march in Germany.
Riding the Rails is a riveting document of hope and hardship during one of this nation's bleakest eras. For all that has been written about the Depression, the travails of those under the age of 18 have been sorely underrepresented. Gripping and well-researched, the reader can all but hear the cadence of the trains and lonesome wail at every whistle-stop. -- Boston Globe
Riding the Rails | Reviews | Letters | About | Interview | Video | Links | MainPage
Letters from boxcar boys and girls... Click to visit this webpage

What an Incredible Adventure ...Berkeley N. Hackett, St. Petersburg, Florida Click to read this letter.
   Berkeley Hackett made his first trip in 1929 at 13, riding with his stepfather from Flint, Michigan to Kalamazoo to get a summer job working in a coal yard at 25 cents an hour. A year later, Berkeley ran away from school and began to beat his way around the country.

Was I Leaving Little for Nothing? ...Leslie E. Paul, Seattle, Washington Click to read this letter.
   Leslie E. Paul's vivid memories of leaving home in the summer of 1933 begin on the back porch of his house in Duluth. He was 18 years old, newly graduated from high school, the son and stepson of railroad men.

And Baby Makes Three ...“D.L.” Young, Youngtown, Arizona Click to read this letter.
   “D.L.” Young was the son of Texas sharecroppers, one of 11 children living on a 100-acre cotton farm near Fairlie, east Texas. In December 1934, when “D.L.” was 18, six feet tall and all of 125 pounds, he hopped a train to Gainesville. At a New Year抯 Eve party, “D.L.” met brown-eyed, brown-haired Thelma Jones, who was fourteen-and-a-half. Smitten at first sight, “D.L.” began to hop the rails with a new purpose, courting Thelma all that winter and summer too.

What a Cruel Thing to do on Mother's Day ...Claude Franklin, Kerrville, Texas Click to read this letter.
   Wanderlust drove Claude Franklin, 13, his brother, Charles, 16, and their buddy, Robert Brookshire, also 13, to run away from their Fort Worth homes on Sunday, May 8, 1938.

I Was Out to See America ...Weaver Dial, Seattle, Washington Click to read this letter.
   Weaver Dial's first ride in 1929 took the 12-year-old over the Cascade Mountains. He left Seattle with his friend, Emmy, at 11 one night; they reached the Auburn yards at 2, and began the eight-hour haul over the mountains shortly afterwards.

Trapped by a Bull ...Henry Koczur, Hammond, Indiana Click to read this letter.
   Henry Koczur left his East Chicago home in September 1932 at 16, believing that one less mouth to feed would lighten the burden on his family of eight. His father was out of work and sick with stomach ulcers; his mother had often to serve potato soup for breakfast, dinner and supper. Henry headed for California, “a land where I didn't think anyone could starve. Many times when the freight trains stopped at night, we'd light a match just to see what was growing in the fields.”

I Saw a Blossom of Stars ...Irving J. Stolet, Albuquerque, New Mexico Click to read this letter.
   Irving Stolet took off from his home in Chicago in October 1936, heading south to Florida with a school friend. -- Irving, 16, would be gone for two years, six months of which he spent on the road. -- Before he reached Georgia, Irving and his friend were separated, as they ran to catch a freight. Traveling on alone, Irving rode into a night of terror in the Deep South.

From Then on I Was a Loner ...Gene Wadsworth, Sequim, Washington Click to read this letter.
   When Gene Wadsworth caught his first freight at age 17 on a winter's night in 1932, he'd never ridden on a train before. Orphaned at age 11, Gene was living at Burley, Idaho, with an uncle who had five children of his own. “Why do you hang around here, when you're not wanted?” one of his cousins asked him. That night, Gene stuffed his few belongings into a flour sack and hit the road.

Jack Rabbit and Ginger Snaps ...Norma Darrah, Seattle, Washington Click to read this letter.
   Norma Darrah hopped her first freight at Owatonna, Minnesota, on a bleak winter's night in March 1938. Eighteen-year-old Norma was traveling with Curly, her husband of seven months, and his 13-year-old nephew, Harry Long. The newspaper Curly worked for in Kenyon, MN, had folded, leaving him out of work. An older brother, a carpenter at Casper, Wyoming offered Curly an apprenticeship in the trade.

On Christmas Day ...Donald E. Newhouser, Gary, Indiana Click to read this letter.
   Born on a farm in Nebraska in 1916, Donald Newhouser rode the rails from 1935 to 1938, following the harvests through the West, the hay fields in Colorado, potato picking in Idaho, apples in Washington, hops in Oregon.

Riding the Rails | Reviews | Letters | About | Interview | Video | Links | MainPage
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386 
  Carving Chips.....   • William Jameson • Nickel Carver Extraordinaire •  
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
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385 
The Civil War had turned thousands of boys into
disciplined foragers, resilient, hardened... proficient in the
use of the railroads, they hit the tracks.
~ Roger A. Bruns
The Hobo Is Dead. Long Live the Hobo.Click to read this article  −by Alex Brand
384 
9 April 2007
Industrial Workers of the World “Little Red Songbook”

I.W.W. Songs  ~  To Fan the Flames of Discontent  ~  Nineteenth Edition, 1923
All Hell Can't Stop Us 11
Big Question 15
Commonwealth Of Toil 34
Count Your Workers Count Them! 29
Dollar Alarm Clock 16
Don't Take My Papa Away From Me 24
Dump The Bosses Off Your Back 11
Everett County Jail 26
Farewell, Frank! 33
Fifty Thousand Lumberjacks 30
Harvest Land 37
Harvest War Song 7
Hold The Fort 38
I Wanna Free Miss Liberty 27
I'm Too Old To Be A Scab 17
Industrial Unionism Speaks To Toilers Of The Sea 21
Industrial Workers Of The World 19
Internationale 3
Joe Hill's Last Will 31
John Golden And The Lawrence Strike 9
May Day Song 28
Mr. Block 18
My Wandering Boy 25
Mysteries Of A Hobo's Life 32
One Big Industrial Union 6
Onward, "One Big Union! 29
Organize! 35
Popular Wobbly 23
Preacher And The Slave 22
Rebel Girl 3
Remember 21
Renunciation 24
Scissor Bill 10
Solidarity Forever 15
The Red Flag 6
There Is Power In A Union 36
They'll Soon Ring Out 28
Tie 'em Up! 31
Tramp 12
Up From Your Knees 12
We Will Sing One Song 4
We Have Fed You All For A Thousand Years 17
Whadda Ya Want To Break Your Back For The Boss For? 13
When You Wear That Button 25
White Slave 14
Workers' Marselllaise 20
Workers' Memorial Song 33
Workers Of The World 8
Workers Of The World, Awaken 5
Workers Of The World Are Now Awaking 7
Worker's Plea 35
Workingmen, Unite! 39
Industrial Workers of the World Songs • “The Little Red Songbook” • London, 1916 Click to visit this webpage.
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383 
9 April 2007
The Adolph Vandertie Collection of Tramp Art
Ashwaubenon Historical Museum
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.     View HUGE image of Adolph Vandertie flyerClick to view an enlargement of this photograph.
View HUGE image of Adolph Vandertie flyerClick to view an enlargement of this photograph.
Adolph Vandertie, who would become the “Grand Duke of the Hobos,” began his life in northern Wisconsin.
He was born May 25, 1911 on a small farm near the Wisconsin community of Lena. His parents, who
originally came from Door County, provided a 16-by-20-foot log cabin for Adolph and his six siblings.
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph. Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
A large portion of The Adolph Vandertie Collection of Tramp Art resides at the Ashwaubenon Historical
Museum
, 737 Cormier Rd, Green Bay, WI 54304 920-429-2863, where the public, scholars, artists, and
fellow whittlers can view and enjoy this body of work. The other major portion of Adolph Vandertie's body
of work resides at: John Michael Kohler Art Center, 608 New York Ave, Sheboygan, WI 53081 920-458-6144.
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph. Click to view an enlargement of this photograph. Click to view an enlargement of this photograph. Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
www.tramp-art.com “Tramp Art Books” Click to visit this website
1975 • Tramp Art An Itinerant抯 Folk Art by Helaine Fendelman
1995 • Hobo & Tramp Art Carving An Authentic American Folk Tradition, By Adolph Vandertie & Patrick Spielamn
1998 • Tramp Art One Notch At A Time by Clifford A. Wallach & Michael Cornish
1999 • Tramp Art A Folk Art Phenomenon by Helaine Fendelman & Jonathan Taylor
www.trampart.com “The Clifford A. Wallach Gallery” Click to visit this website
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382 
For every mile of beautiful scenery and warm sunshine,
there are hundreds of miles of cold, dark nights, no food
and no one to care whether I live or die.
~ Rambling Rudy
The American HoboClick to read this article  −by Colin Beesley
381 
  Carving Chips.....   • Several Days Spent Building HTML Searches •  
   My Mama always relates that as a child her favorite son, since I am her only son, simply LOVED puzzles of any kind. I admit that is still true here MANY decades later. Writing HTML code to do something esoteric, the usefulness of which certainly could be debated, is simply something that I cannot put down and walk away from. You can see here what I've been beating on for the last few days. Mostly they work as desired... MOSTLY! <BG> ~ V-Dubya
380 
6 April 2007
A Four-Pack from “The California Kid”
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Crossing the Carqueniz Straits between Martinez and Benica, California on the Southern Pacific.
My Happy Hobo Days     −by Peter Hoffman “The California Kid”
   Oklahoma Slim, better known as “The Mayor of Beverly” was quoted as saying: “A hobo is a migratory laborer and a tramp is a migratory non-laborer and a bum is a non-migratory non-laborer.” In my youth I probably fit into the last category, I'm sure my mom thought so. But “My Bum Days” doesn't make for a good title, although I had my share of them. It was the 1950s. I was in love with railroading and influenced by Jack Keroac's “On The Road” life style. The folk movement was in full swing and Bob Dylan, Woodie Guthrie and Pete Seeger were singing ballads romanticizing life on the rails.
Continue reading this article
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph. Railroad Memories     −by Peter Hoffman “The California Kid”
   From before I can remember I was a railroad fan. Recently I came across a old box of photos I took as a young teenager more than fifty years ago. Although none of them are particulaty significant, I would like to share them with those of you who also have a love of western railroading.
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← The San Joaquin Daylight double heading through the Tehachapis during the late 1940s.
Summit Station and the Donner Pass Snowsheds
Click to view an enlargement of this photograph.
−by Peter Hoffman “The California Kid”
   These rare photographs were taken just after the turn of the 20th century by an unknown photographer believed to have been a member of the Southern Pacific fire crew stationed at Summit Station, California, just west of the summit of Donner Pass. My great uncle was on the fire crew and this was his album.
These photographs have not been made public before.
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← The covered turntable at Summit Station was the first of its kind in the U.S.
The Railroad Years     −by Mary Walker
OR, HOME IS WHERE YOU HANG YOUR HAT
   Havre, is one of the larger towns of the north Montana prairie. In the 1940s, it relied on the local farmers and ranchers for the bulk of it's income. Also, the fact that it was a major terminal on the Great Northern Railroad added to the population as well as the economy. Not long gone were the rip roaring times of it's past that had made Havre the epitome of a wild west town. As far as the railroad was Continue reading this article concerned, Havre was a crew change point, with classification yards, a roundhouse, rip track, and all the other things that made up a terminal.
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379 
5 April 2007
###  Mama Jo's Tracks  ###
“Hit the road Jack!”
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   A hobo uses a moniker instead of his or her real name. The moniker is a road name or you might consider it a nickname. Every since the “Knights of the Road,” known as hobos, have existed they have used monikers. A well known hobo during the Great Depression years is “Gas Can Paddy” who is now 90 years old and living in Illinois.
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   Gas Can Paddy had gotten caught riding the rails and was told by a railroad bull basically to “Hit the road Jack!” or go to jail. He decided to hitch-hike to another town to catch the rails. He had spent a few days walking and trying to hitch-hike with no luck.
   He saw a guy with a gas can catch a ride immediately. This inspired him. He bought a gas can and he too caught a ride. The guy after driving for a period of time stated; “Guy, where is your car?” He replied I am a hobo trying to get as far as I can near a town with a railroad to catch out again. He explained he tried hitch-hiking with no luck but saw a man catch a ride who was carring a gas can. The guy laughed and took him eighty-five miles to a town and wished him luck.
   He used a gas can for his bindle (usually a neckerchief tied to a hoe with various items, such as socks, stored in it) to carry his personal belongings. A hobo suitcase you might say. The hobos, seeing him carry a gas can, gave him the moniker of Gas Can Paddy. The modern day hobo uses a duffle bag or a back pack for a “bindle.” ~ Hoboically, Mama Jo ~ Hobo Queen 2003/2004   { Carpet bags were commonly used for bindles in the late 19th Century. ~ V-Dubya }
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378 
  Carving Chips.....   • Grandpa Dudley with Mad Mary •  
Grandpa Dudley
King of Hobos 2001/2002
with

Mad Mary
Queen of Hobos 2000/2001

Hear a Grandpa Sing
Requires Real Audio Player or Windows Media Player
I'm My Own Grandpa
Now many many years ago when I was twenty-three
I was married to a widow who was pretty as can be.
This widow had a grown-up daughter who had hair of red.
My father fell in love with her and soon they too were wed.
This made my dad my son-in-law and changed my very life.
My daughter was my mother, 'cause she was my father's wife.
To complicate the matter even though it brought me joy,
I soon became the father of a bouncing baby boy.
My little baby then became a brother-in-law to Dad,
And so became my uncle though it was very sad.
For if he was my uncle then that also made him brother
Of the widow's grown-up daughter who of course was my step-mother.
Father's wife then had a son who kept him on the run,
And he became my grandchild for he was my daughter's son.
My wife is now my mother's mother and it makes me blue,
Because although she is my wife she's my grandmother, too.
Now if my wife is my grandmother then I'm her grandchild,
And every time I think of it it nearly drives me wild,
For now I have become the strangest case I ever saw.
As husband of my grandmother, I am my own grandpa.
Oh, I'm my own grandpa
I'm my own grandpa
It sounds funny I know
But it really is so
Oh, I'm my own grandpa.
 
377 
  Carving Chips.....   • Everywhere I look I see potential carved nickels!
Click to view enlarged version.Click to view enlarged version.Click to view enlarged version.
Beautiful .986 Fine Gold Reproduction Greek Coins by Antiquanova ~ Petr Sousek and Pavel Neumann ~ Brno, Czech Republic.
{ Note: These photos are no longer accurate representations of the reproduction Greek coins since I cut-n-diced them with my little graphics editor. ~ V-Dubya }
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376 
  Carving Chips.....   • What People Did For Amusement Before They Had T-V's Click to see entire collection
Click to view enlarged version... 1914-SClick to view enlarged version... 1913T2-PClick to view enlarged version... 1918-PClick to view enlarged version... 1914-PClick to view enlarged version... ND-SClick to view enlarged version... 1913T1-P
Click to view enlarged version... ND-PClick to view enlarged version... ND-PClick to view enlarged version... ND-PClick to view enlarged version... 1913T2-PClick to view enlarged version... 1913T1-PClick to view enlarged version... 1918-P
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375 
  Carving Chips.....   • “The Cat in the Hat” looks pretty good for being 50 years old! •  
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Click to view an enlargement of DCP#5 photograph.
Degs
Click to view Derek Pegnall's items for sale on eBay
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374 
1 April 2007
Restroom etching may have been done by famed hobo
By− ELO蚐A RUANO GONZ罫EZ ~ YAKIMA HERALD-REPUBLIC ~ Published on Sunday, March 18, 2007
   If only walls could talk.
 KRIS HOLLAND/Yakima Herald-Republic
This etching on the marble wall at the Depot Restaurant and Lounge may have been made by famed hobo A-No.1 in 1935.
   They might rattle on about Yakima's birth, when horses wheeled the city on logs to what's now downtown after the Pacific Railroad built its depot in 1884. Or maybe they'd chatter about Yakima's 50th birthday bash, which attracted scores of people from across the state who roamed through the city streets and the depot.
   And if someone closely listened -- or looked -- the walls could open a window into the lives of the hobos during the Great Depression.
   Today's women can get that chance while using the bathroom at The Depot Restaurant and Lounge (the old train station) at 32 N. Front St. in Yakima.
   Owner Karl Pasten said a customer discovered an etching nearly six months ago that could have been done by a famous hobo and author, A-No.1, on a marble divider in the women's restroom. The room had been the men's restroom after the depot was rebuilt in 1910, said Pasten, who has owned the building for about five years. The marble walls in the bathrooms are the originals, he added.
   Although the woman who discovered the marks claimed to have recognized the hobo's name from a movie, “Emperor of the North,” Pasten had never heard of him.
   But that changed after he watched the film. He then realized what the carving -- nearly an eighth of an inch deep and dated 1935 -- could mean for his historical lounge, and the city, if it's authentic.
   Pasten said it brings the area's history alive, like the stories visitors have shared of reuniting with their fathers at the train station after World War II and the trembling from the trains as they passed by.
   “It (the etching) adds to the ambiance here,” he said. “It's something you can look at and touch. It's something that was done by a famous hobo.”
   The 1973 film was directed by Robert Aldrich and based on a short story by Jack London, who had apparently traveled with A-No.1. It captured the hobo's adventures and life-threatening dangers hopping rails during the peak of the Great Depression in 1933.
   Although the movie didn't mention it, many people believe A-No.1 was, in fact, Leon Ray Livingston, author of more than a dozen books on hobos and the railways.
   Livingston, who was born in 1872, wrote “Life and Adventures of A-No.1: America's Most Celebrated Tramp,” “The Trail of the Tramp” and “From Coast to Coast with Jack London.” Most of his books were published in the early 1900s by A-No.1 Publication Co. in Erie, Pa., where he is believed to have died in 1944.
 KRIS HOLLAND/Yakima Herald-Republic
Depot owner Carl Paston searches the restroom wall for the etching Wednesday. Many believe A-No.1 was Leon Ray Livingston.
   And Livingston reportedly traveled often on the Northern Pacific Railway, which ran through the Valley, stopping in Yakima, Wapato and Toppenish.
   Doug Shearer, vice president of the Toppenish-based Yakima Valley Rail and Steam Museum Association, said trains were the only means of transportation in the area during the late 1800s and early 1900s. He said dozens of trains ran every day on the rail that stretched from Minnesota to Puget Sound, and it linked up with other railways throughout the country, making it easy for hobos to travel.
   It also was common for people to sneak onto the trains during the Depression, he said. His uncles did that to get to school in Southern California during the early 1900s. Even while growing up in Toppenish in the '50s, Shearer said he saw many hobos sitting in boxcars.
   Though he said it's “likely” A-No.1 stopped at Yakima's depot, Shearer remains skeptical of the engraving's authenticity.
   “I'm surprised they (owners) had never seen it before,” he said. “You have to be skeptical -- there's things that are passed off (as original).”
   But as he searched the bathrooms' marble walls in his Toppenish museum (the old train station), he added, “I would love to have that, an etching by him that's authentic, and it wasn't scratched last week.”
   Pasten believes it's genuine, though. He suspects no one today would've spent that much time deeply carving into marble a hobo's name, date and mysterious hobo symbol. And he feels the dates add up.
   Jeff Champ, bartender at The Depot, said one thing is for sure: A-No.1 has added more life to the building. He said customers jump to their feet and run to the bathroom when they hear the story of the famous hobo who's been etched into the area's history.
   “I wish these walls could talk because everybody has stories of the depot,” Pasten said. “(But) my wife says, 'These walls are talking.'”
* Elo韘a Ruano Gonz醠ez can be reached at 577-7749 or at egonzalez@yakimaherald.com.
Some books written by Leon Ray Livingston (A-No.1?):
* “Life and Adventure of A-No.1”
* “Hobo-Camp-Fire-Tales”
* “The Curse of Tramp Life”
* “The Trail of the Tramp”
* “The Adventures of a Female Tramp”
* “The Ways of the Hobo”
* “The Snare of the Road”
* “From Coast to Coast with Jack London”
* “The Mother of All Hoboes”
* “The Wife I Won: His Greatest Adventures”
* “Mother Delcassee of the Hoboes and Other Stories”
              -- Information from www.firstsearch.oclc.org
www.yakimaherald.com
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