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 It's All Greek to Me !  ~  “Graecum est; non potest legi”
These Greek busts would look really COOL carved on nickels!                      Check out: APOLLONIANS Click to visit this “Great Britain” eBay Shop.  
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Athena
566-514BC
Athena
465-443BC
Dionysos
461-430BC
Apollo
461-413BC
Hermes
450-400BC
Hermes
450-400BC
Apollo
424-358BC
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Hera
421-402BC
Arethusa This is a mirror image of actual coin.
413-357BC
Dionysos This is a mirror image of actual coin.
411-350BC
Athena This is a mirror image of actual coin.
400-338BC
Apollo This is a mirror image of actual coin.
370BC
Persephone This is a mirror image of actual coin.
369-338BC
Zeus
359-336BC
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Demeter This is a mirror image of actual coin.
346-338BC
Heracles
336-323BC
Alexander
323-291BC
Athena
310-266BC
King Areus This is a mirror image of actual coin.
310-266BC
Poseidon
277-239BC
Helios
230-205BC
This is a mirror image of actual coin.” ~ These images do not accurately represent the originals because I mirrored them to show all busts facing to the right.
Also... these photos are of reproductions coins and not original specimens. ~ V-Dubya
Athena 566-514BC
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   Click to return from whence you came! Greek Athenian Tetradrachm 566-514BC (Pisistratid Period)
Athena and Owl in vertical stance

Obv: Click camera to see this specimen. Athena in archaic helmet. Typical archaic smile on her face and almond-shaped eye.
Rev: Click camera to see this specimen. Incuse square, within which Owl, right head facing, wings closed, in vertical stance. At top left corner, olive-spray. Initials Ğ?T?ğ stands for Atheneon.
Date: 566-514BC
Specs: 2.5cm ~ 17grams ~ Silver .999
    Post-Solonian and Pisistratid Period coins consists mainly of rude silver bullets of 270 grs. (max.), which must have been originally called didrachms, though after the exchange, at Athens, of the heavy Euboïc mina for the light mina, exactly half its weight, they became tetradrachms. These pieces bear on the obverse a head of Athena of very archaic style in an unadorned crested helmet and on the reverse an Owl with the inscription ?T? and an olive-spray in the corner of the incuse square. It is noticeable that on the latter specimens the incuse square is sharper and deeper than on the earlier ones, and their fabric suggests the probability of their having been struck at Eretria. In style the coins of the early Athenian issues range from the most primitive to the most refined archaic. Among them are the oldest and rudest examples of a human head. The issues are very numerous, and there is reason to suppose that they extended over a long series of years, probably from the earlier half of the sixth century at least down to the time of Hippias, those of finer execution belonging to the later times of the Pisistratidae, when their money-chests were frequently replenished from their recently developed mining works at Laurium, and in their newly acquired possessions in the Strymon district.

Athena 465-443BC
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   Click to return from whence you came! Greek Athenian Tetradrachm 465-443BC

Obv: Click camera to see this specimen. Head of Athena of archaic style, her helmet adorned in front with three olive-leaves erect, and at the back with a floral scroll; her hair in bands across her temples, and indicated by dots under the neck-piece of the helmet.
Rev: Click camera to see this specimen. Incuse square, within which, "the Owl" (symbol of wisdom), head facing, wings closed; behind, olive-spray and small decrescent moon. Letters ?T? (standing for Atheneon - Athens) are on the right on a vertical stance
Date: 465-443BC
Specs: 2.5cm ~ 17grams ~ Silver .999
   The Athenian type of Athena on the obverse and the owl on the reverse was introduced perhaps around 566 in honour of the Festival of the Panathenaic Games. The type is from that time constant throughout Athenian history. The portrait of Athena is probably the oldest example of a human head on ancient coinage. The type with both the portrait on the obverse and the owl on the reverse is the earliest Greek coinage with both an obverse and reverse type.

Dionysos 461-430BC
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   Click to return from whence you came! Greek Tetradrachm (Naxos) 461-430BC

Obv: Click camera to see this specimen. Bearded head of Dionysos right, wearing wreath of ivy, hair tied in bunch behind head.
Rev: Click camera to see this specimen. Nude and ithyphallic Silenos (elderly satyr) squatting facing, head left, holding “kilikas” (type of glass) in right hand, leaning on left.
Date: 461-430BC
Specs: 2.5cm ~ 17grams ~ Silver .999
   Although never a place of political importance, the city of Naxos was the earliest of the Greek colonies in Sicily, having been founded from Chalkis about 735BC by a contingent of settlers many of whom we may assume had originated from the Aegean island of that name. Moreover, Naxos was the mother-city of two more celebrated Sicilian communities, those of Leontini and Katana. In 476BC, the population of Naxos was removed to Leontini by Hieron of Syracuse. They returned home fifteen years later in 461BC, and this tetradrachm may have been struck to celebrate that event. The issue is struck from only one pair of dies, probably from the same hand as the unique Aetna tetradrachm in the Brussels cabinet. In an auction on January the 11th 2005, the original coin was sold for $35,000!

Apollo 461-413BC
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   Click to return from whence you came! Greek Tetradrachm of Catana (Sicily) 461-413BC ~ Apollo and Quadriga

Obv: Click camera to see this specimen. Laureate head of Apollo right. Greek initials “?????????” (KATANEON).
Rev: Click camera to see this specimen. Charioteer driving slow quadriga right holding reins and kentron (2 horses).
Date: 461-413BC
Specs: 2.5cm ~ 17grams ~ Silver .999
   Catana, which stood at the foot of Mount Aetna, was a Chalcidian colony from Naxus. Its inhabitants were expelled by Hieron of Syracuse 476BC, to make way for a colony of Syracusans. These were, however, driven out 461BC, and the old inhabitants restored. The name of the town was changed to Aetna by Hieron when he founded his new colony there, but it was again called Catana after 461BC. Catana was for a time the head-quarters of the Athenians during their expedition against Syracuse. The finest coins date from this time until the capture of the city by Dionysius in 404BC, when, according to his frequent practice, he sold the population into slavery and gave up the city to his Campanian mercenaries.

Hermes 450-400BC
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   Click to return from whence you came! Greek Drachm from Thrace (Aenus) 450-400BC ~ God Hermes and Kerykeion

Obv: Click camera to see this specimen. Laureate head of Hermes right, wearing petasus with row of rivets.
Rev: Click camera to see this specimen. The Kerykeion, symbol of God Hermes. Initials “A-I” on both sides of the coin stand for Ğ?????ğ (Aenus).
Date: 450-400BC
Specs: 1.7cm ~ 4grams ~ Silver .999
   Aenus was an important city which stood at the mouth of the Hebrus, and thus commanded the navigation of that river, which brought it into commercial relations with all the eastern regions of Thrace. It did not begin to coin money at so early a date as Abdera, the higher limit of its currency being the middle of the fifth century.
   A caduceus or kerykeion is a winged staff with two snakes wrapped around it. It was an ancient astrological symbol of commerce and is associated with the Greek god Hermes, the messenger for the gods, conductor of the dead and protector of merchants and thieves. It was originally a herald's staff, sometimes with wings, with two white ribbons attached. The ribbons eventually evolved into snakes.
   In some cases, depictions of the Greek kerykeion can be radically different from that of the traditional caduceus. These representations will feature the two snakes atop the wand (rod), crossed to create a circle with the heads of the snakes resembling "horns." In this form, it looks remarkably similar to the symbol for the planet Mercury while Mercury the god is the Roman name for Hermes, who carries the kerykeion, or caduceus. The Greek messenger goddess Iris also carried the caduceus. The basic power of the Caduceus is the primal power to heal or harm.

Hermes 450-400BC
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   Click to return from whence you came! Greek Tetradrachm 450-400BC (Aenus-Thrace) ~ God Hermes

Obv: Click camera to see this specimen. Head of Hermes to right, wearing petasos with a beaded border and a button top, his hair wound around his head in a plait.
Rev: Click camera to see this specimen. Incuse square with Goat standing. Greek initials "???-?" inscribed at the back stand for Aenus.
Date: 450-400BC
Specs: 2.6cm ~ 17grams ~ Silver .999
   Aenus was an important city which stood at the mouth of the Hebrus, and thus commanded the navigation of that river, which brought it into commercial relations with all the eastern regions of Thrace. It did not begin to coin money at so early a date as Abdera, the higher limit of its currency being the middle of the fifth century. Hermes in Greek mythology, is the Olympian god of boundaries and of the travelers who cross them, of shepherds and cowherds, of orators and wit, of literature and poets, of athletics, of weights and measures and invention and commerce in general, and of the cunning of thieves and liars. As a translator, Hermes is the messenger from the gods to humans.

Apollo 424-358BC
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   Click to return from whence you came! Greek Tetradrachm of Amphipolis (Macedonian) 424-358BC
Full face head of Apollo and race torch

Obv: Click camera to see this specimen. Head of Apollo in wreath, three-quarter face in dotted circle.
Rev: Click camera to see this specimen. ??F-???-???-?O? (AMFIPOLITEON) writen on a raised frame in an incuse square. In the midst, a race torch.
Date: 424-358BC
Specs: 2.5cm ~ 17grams ~ Silver .999
   Amphipolis, on the Strymon, although founded 437BC by the Athenians, does not seem to have struck money until some years after its capture by Brasidas 424BC, from which time until it was taken by Philip in 358BC it remained practically free. The magnificent series. of full-face heads of Apollo on the coins of Amphipolis, as works of art, perhaps excel the types of any other city of Northern Greece. Kimon of Syracuse was probably the first die-engraver who successfully mastered the difficulty of worthily representing a full-face head on coins. His wonderful Arethusa-head with flowing hair seems to have roused the emulation of the die-engravers of many cities, Catana, Croton, and Pandosia in the west, Larissa and Thebes in Central Greece, Aenus and Amphipolis in the north, Rhodes and Clazomenae in the east, among others. But none of all these has left us such a rich and varied series of full-face heads as Amphipolis. The fashion, however, was found to be unsuitable for current coins, and it prevailed only during the period of finest art, circ. 410-360BC. The Race-torch, the usual reverse-type of the coins of Amphipolis, reminds us of the worship of Artemis Tauropolos or Brauronia, who was especially revered at Amphipolis, and in whose honour Torch-races, Lampadephoria, were held. The weight-standard is the Phoenician.

Hera 421-402BC
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   Click to return from whence you came! Greek Stater from Olympia (Peloponnesus) 421-402BC ~ Goddess Hera

Obv: Click camera to see this specimen. Head of Hera right wearing lofty stephanos adorned with conventional floral design. The legend ?-?-? (Hera) on the stephanos.
Rev: Click camera to see this specimen. Flaming thunderbolt, considered to be Zeus’; all within olive wreath. Initials “F-A” stand for Faleion (F????O?).
Date: 421-402BC
Specs: 2.3cm ~ 12.5grams ~ Silver .999
   Hera: In Greek mythology, queen of the gods, the daughter of the Titans Cronus and Rhea, and the sister and wife of the god Zeus. Hera was the goddess of marriage and the protector of married women. She was the mother of Ares, god of war; Hephaestus, god of fire; Hebe, goddess of youth; and Eileithyia, goddess of childbirth. Hera was a jealous wife, who often persecuted Zeus's mistresses and children. She never forgot an injury and was known for her vindictive nature. Angry with the Trojan prince Paris for preferring Aphrodite, goddess of love, to herself, Hera aided the Greeks in the Trojan War and was not appeased until Troy was finally destroyed. Hera is often identified with the Roman goddess Juno.

Arethusa This is a mirror image of actual coin. 413-357BC
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   Click to return from whence you came! Greek Decadrachm from Sicily (Syracuse) 413-357BC
Unsigned and exquisite work by Euainetos

Obv: Click camera to see this specimen.This is a mirror image of actual coin. Fast quadriga (4 horses) driven by charioteer, holding reins and kentron. In field above, Nike flying to crown him. In exergue, display of military harness set on two steps. These military signs are a helmet, a thorax and two greaves. All in dotted circle.
Rev: Click camera to see this specimen. Arethusa (Kore-Persephone) wearing barley-wreath, triple pendant earring and beaded necklace. Behind neck, scallop shell and below chin, a short vertical line. Around three dolphins, while a fourth makes dorsal contact with neck truncation. Greek initials S?????S?O? (SIRAKOSION) in circular writing.
Date: 413-357BC
Specs: 3.6cm ~ 40grams ~ Silver .999
   This magnificent dekadrachm was issued after the Athenian defeat, like the Demareteia after the battle of Himera. The arms in the exergue may be arms taken from the Athenians and offered as prizes in the Assinarian games which were established to commemorate the event. Euaenetos was possibly absent from Syracuse at the time so that Kimon was employed to make the first dies. The unsigned dekadrachms are thought to have come next, but as only two specimens (from the same dies) are known, these cannot have been issued for any length of time; and it is possible that they may be the latest of all the series. The dekadrachm of Euaenetos seems to have been more generally admired than any other coin in antiquity (as in modern times), except perhaps the tetradrachm by Kimon with the facing head of Arethusa; both obverses were often copied in other mints. Dekadrachms in the style of Euaenetos continued to be issued during the reign of Dionysius I. The issue of tetradrachms during this period was, on the other hand, somewhat restricted. In addition to the tetradrachms reproducing exactly the obverse types of the dekadrachms of Kimon and Euaenetos, there were issued the following of which the first is Kimon's masterpiece, and admittedly the finest representation of the facing human head on any coin.

Dionysos This is a mirror image of actual coin. 411-350BC
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   Click to return from whence you came! Greek Stater of Thasos (Thrace) 419-350BC ~ Dionysos and Hercules (Heracles)

Obv: Click camera to see this specimen.This is a mirror image of actual coin. Head of Dionysos left, bearded or young, ivy-crowned.
Rev: Click camera to see this specimen. Bearded Herakles kneeling, shooting with bow, in linear and incuse square. His bat standing on his left leg. Vertically written T?S??? (THASION).
Date: 411-350BC
Specs: 2.3cm ~ 12.5grams ~ Silver .999
   In 411BC Thasos revolted from Athens and received a Lacedaemonian garrison, but was afterwards again dependent upon Athens. As at Acanthus and other towns on the mainland, an abrupt change of standard from Attic to so-called Rhodian took place at Thasos, in the last quarter of the fifth century. This, in the ease of the Thasian money, is accompanied by a change in the types. Gold coins in small quantities were also issued at this time.
   Dionysos, the Thracian god of wine, represents not only the intoxicating power of wine, but also its social and beneficial influences. He is viewed as the promoter of civilization, a lawgiver, and lover of peace as well as the patron deity of agriculture and the theater. He was also known as the Liberator, freeing one from one's normal self, by madness, ecstasy, or wine. The divine mission of Dionysus was to mingle the music of the flute and to bring an end to care and worry. There is also an aspect of Dionysus on his relationship to the "cult of the souls".
   Hercules is the Latin name used in Rome for the divinity corresponding to the Greek mythological hero Heracles (or Herakles), the Roman name being a metathesis of the Greek name. He was son of Jupiter and grandson of Theseus, the Roman counterpart to the Greek god Zeus and the mortal Alcmene. He was made to perform twelve great tasks, called “The Twelve Labours of Hercules” and became a god.

Athena This is a mirror image of actual coin. 400-338BC
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   Click to return from whence you came! Corinthian Stater 400-338BC

Obv: Click camera to see this specimen.This is a mirror image of actual coin. Head of Athena, of fine style, in Corinthian helmet over large neck-flap.
Rev: Click camera to see this specimen. Pegasos, usually flying, with pointed wing , but occasionally standing or walking, with curled wing.
Date: 400-338BC
Specs: 2.2cm ~ 8.5grams ~ Silver .999
   The Pegasos staters of Corinth, familiarly called p???? (Poll. ix. 6, 76), were the principal medium of exchange along all the coasts of the Corinthian Gulf, and even beyond the seas in Italy and Sicily, where the largest hoards of them have been brought to light. In its divisional system the Corinthian coinage possessed a practical advantage over both the Attic and the Aeginetic, which enabled it to pass current in the territories of its great rivals. Thus the Corinthian stater of about 130 grs. would pass as a didrachm side by side with the tetradrachms of Athens, while the Corinthian drachm (1/3 stater) of about 44 grs. was practically equivalent to an Aeginetic hemidrachm. The region in which the Corinthian money circulated was therefore at no time confined to the narrow isthmus and limited territory of the town of Corinth.

Apollo This is a mirror image of actual coin. 370BC
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   Click to return from whence you came! Ionian Tetradrachm (Clazomenae) 370BC ~ God Apollo and Swan

Obv: Click camera to see this specimen.This is a mirror image of actual coin. Laureate head of Apollo facing, turned slightly to the left, with chlamys around his neck
Rev: Click camera to see this specimen. Swan standing to left with open wings, head facing ahead. Bears magistrate's name "?????O???" (mandronax)
Date: 370BC
Specs: 2.5cm ~ 17grams ~ Silver .999
   The swan, which is the characteristic reverse-type of the finest coins of Clazomenae, is one of the many symbols of Apollo, and it has been suggested that the name of Clazomenae may have been derived from the plaintive notes of these birds which are said to abound in the Delta of the Hermus. The autonomous silver coinage of Clazomenae does not extend beyond the battle of Ipsus, and the victory of Seleucus and Lysimachus over Antigonus and Demetrius. During the whole of the third-century Alexandrine, Lysimachian, and Seleucid silver money superseded for the most part the autonomous local issues of former times. Mind that all coins having a god's full face are very rare and bear the signature of the artist which manufactured it.

Persephone This is a mirror image of actual coin. 369-338BC
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   Click to return from whence you came! Greek Stater from Locris 369-338BC ~ Armoured Ajax and Head of Persephone

Obv: Click camera to see this specimen.This is a mirror image of actual coin. Wreathed head of Persephone left wearing triple pendant earring and a necklace. Head of goddess crowned with leaves, copied from the famous Syracusan dekadrachm by Euainetos.
Rev: Click camera to see this specimen. The Locrian Ajax nude, the son of Oïleus advancing right, brandishing sword and shield decorated with serpent; Corinthian helmet between legs, broken spear on ground. Underneath Ajax’s figure, in between his legs, his name writen in Greek AIAS (???S). Also, greek letters ??????-O? (OPODION) in circular writing.
Date: 369-338BC
Specs: 2.3cm ~ 12.5grams ~ Silver .999
   After the battle of Chaeroneia, 338BC, it is probable that Opus, like Thebes, fell under the displeasure of Philip, and that, as in Boeotia the right of issuing silver was transferred from Thebes to the Boeotians, so also in Locris it was transferred from Opus to the Locrians collectively.
   In Homer's Iliad he is described as of great stature and colossal frame, the tallest and strongest of all the Achaeans, second only to his cousin Achilles in skill-at-arms, and the 'bulwark of the Achaeans'. He was trained by the centaur Chiron (who had also trained his father, Telamon, and Achilles' father Peleus), at the same time as Achilles. Aside from Achilles, Ajax is the most valuable warrior in Agamemnon's army, though he is not as intelligent as Nestor, Idomeneus, or, of course, Odysseus. He commands his army wielding a great axe and a huge shield made of seven ox-hides with a layer of bronze. He is not wounded in any of the battles described in the Iliad, and he is the only principal character on either side who does not receive personal assistance from any of the gods who take part in the battles. As such, he embodies the virtues of hard work and perseverance.
   In Homer's Iliad he is described as of great stature and colossal frame, the tallest and strongest of all the Achaeans, second only to his cousin Achilles in skill-at-arms, and the 'bulwark of the Achaeans'. He was trained by the centaur Chiron (who had also trained his father, Telamon, and Achilles' father Peleus), at the same time as Achilles. Aside from Achilles, Ajax is the most valuable warrior in Agamemnon's army, though he is not as intelligent as Nestor, Idomeneus, or, of course, Odysseus. He commands his army wielding a great axe and a huge shield made of seven ox-hides with a layer of bronze. He is not wounded in any of the battles described in the Iliad, and he is the only principal character on either side who does not receive personal assistance from any of the gods who take part in the battles. As such, he embodies the virtues of hard work and perseverance.

Zeus 359-336BC
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   Click to return from whence you came! Classic Macedonian Tetradrachm 359-336BC ~ King Philip II

Obv: Click camera to see this specimen. Head of Zeus, laureate
Rev: Click camera to see this specimen. Naked Macedonian horse-man, bearing palm or crowning his horse, with his right hand. The greek words F????-??? writen over the rider’s head, is Macedonian king’s name, Philip
Date: 359-336BC
Specs: 2.5cm ~ 17grams ~ Silver .999
   King Philip II (born in 386) ruled Macedonia from 359 to 336BC (when he was assassinated) and was the first to envision the dream of uniting Greece into one single nation. He was born in Pella and gave birth to Alexander the Great. After his fathers death, Macedonia slowly disintegrated as his elder brothers and future kings Alexander II and Perdiccas III, unsuccessfully fought against the continuous attacks of the neighboring Thracians, Illyrians, and Greeks. Apart from military, Philip had several political inventions that helped turn Macedonia into a power. His primary method of creating alliances and strengthening loyalties was through marriages, and it is said that he was more prouder of his diplomatic maneuvers then of his military victories.

Demeter This is a mirror image of actual coin. 346-338BC
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   Click to return from whence you came! Stater of Delphi 346-338BC (Amfiktionia)

Obv: Click camera to see this specimen.This is a mirror image of actual coin. Head of Demeter of Anthela veiled and crowned with corn.
Rev: Click camera to see this specimen. Apollo in long chiton, with lyre and laurel-branch, seated on Delphian omphalos, over which hang fillets. The greek word ??F??????O? (Amfiktionon) writen in a circular way on the coin means Amfiktionia (please see description below)
Date: 346-338BC
Specs: 2.3cm ~ 12.5grams ~ Silver .999
   Amfiktionia used to be a unity of neighbouring town-cities (forming the Amphictyonic Council) in which all representatives gathered a specific day, in a specific temple to hold a religious feast and resolve their disputes in peace. The most important of all gatherings was the Amfiktionia of Delphi one which was constituted by 12 races. This remarkable coin seem to has been first issued on the occasion of the reassembling of the Amphictyonic Council at the close of the Phocian war (346BC). At each meeting of the Council, markets or fairs were held, for which such coins may have been struck, but the great Pythian festival of 346BC is by far the most probable date of issue.

Heracles 336-323BC
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   Click to return from whence you came! Macedonian Tetradrachm of Alexander The Great 336-323BC

Obv: Click camera to see this specimen. Head of young Heracles (Hercules) in lion skin. The design is encircled by a dotted line.
Rev: Click camera to see this specimen. Zeus seated on backlessthrone with eagle sitting on extended right hand, holding his sceptre in left. Alexander's name is put downwards right (??????????)
Date: 336-323BC
Specs: 1.9cm ~ 4grams ~ Silver .999
    Under the tutorship of Aristotle, Alexander, son of Philip, proved to be highly intelligent and charismatic. He died at the age of 33, inarguably the greatest general of antiquity and worthy of the epithet “the Great”. Alexander the Great altered the standard of the coinage system to meet the Attic standard. On the silver coinage he introduced the Herakles/Zeus types which were minted for centuries after his death, sometimes making their dating difficult.In conquering the Achaemenid Empire, Alexander III encountered the difficulty of financing his new state. The collection of taxes and tribute, the payment of Macedonian soldiers and mercenaries, and the continued daily local transactions, all of which had formerly occurred under a complex system of exchange, now occurred within a more standardized system of coinage.
   Apart from those very few local issues which Alexander himself or his governors continued to strike, this new, so-called “imperial”, coinage consisted of issues in gold, silver, and bronze. Each particular issue featured its own iconography that emphasized the Hellenic nature and mytho-historic importance of the new regime. The vast majority Alexander’s new coinage was struck in silver, namely the tetradrachm and its fractions. Based on the Attic standard, which had been the economic lingua franca of much of the Greek world, these denominations show the head of a young Herakles, the ancestor and patron of the Macedonian royal house, on the obverse, and Zeus Aëtophoros, the king of the Greek pantheon, on the reverse. This 'Alexandrine' type, which was originated by Alexander but continued to be struck long after his death by many of his successors, soon became the accepted international currency during the Hellenistic Period.

Alexander 323-291BC
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   Click to return from whence you came! Greek Tetradrachm of Thrace 323-291BC ~ King Lysimachos
Alexander the Great and Athena Nikephoros

Obv: Click camera to see this specimen. Head of the deified Alexander with horn of Ammon.
Rev: Click camera to see this specimen. Athena Nikephoros seated. Nike with open wings standing on Athena’s right hand. Athena leaning on shield wearing Corinthian helmet. On her right hand side she has her spear.
Date: 323-291BC
Specs: 2.5cm ~ 17grams ~ Silver .999
   The money of this king is more plentiful than that of any other of the successors of Alexander. His reign may be divided into three periods. I. 323-311BC, from the death of Alexander to that of the young Alexander (the son of Roxana). In this period Lysimachus, as Regent in Thrace, struck money in the name of Alexander the Great and of Philip Aridaeus with Alexandrine types. II. 311-306BC, from the death of the son of Roxana to the date of the adoption by Lysimachus of the title ?as??e?? (King). The coins of this period still bear the name of Alexander, though the letters ?? (LI) are frequently added. III. 306-281BC, coins inscribed ??S???OS ??S?????? (King Lysimachos), at first with types of Alexander, and later with Lysimachus’ own types.
   The money of Lysimachus was issued from numerous mints, in Thrace 311-281BC, in Macedon 286-281BC, and in Asia Minor 302-281BC. After the death of Lysimachus his coins were imitated, indiscriminately with those of Alexander, by numerous autonomous cities, by no means exclusively in Thrace.

Athena 310-266BC
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   Click to return from whence you came! Greek Tetradrachm from Sparta (Lakedaimonians) 310-266BC

Obv: Click camera to see this specimen. Helmeted head of Athena to right.
Rev: Click camera to see this specimen. Aged Herakles seated left on a rock covered by his lion skin, resting his right hand on the handle of his club and his left on the rock. Greek initials ?-? stand for LACEDAEMON.
Date: 310-266BC
Specs: 2.5cm ~ 17grams ~ Silver .999
   The Lakedaimonians were the only full-time army in ancient Greece. Their state institutions and system of education were designed for the purpose of creating superbly trained soldiers.In Greek mythology, Lacedaemon was a son of Zeus by Taygete, and was married to Sparta the daughter of Eurotas, by whom he became the father of Amyclas, Eurydice, and Asine. He was king of the country which he called after his own name, Lacedaemon, while he gave to his capital the name of his wife, Sparta. He was believed to have built the sanctuary of the Charites, which stood between Sparta and Amyclae, and to have given to those divinities the names of Cleta and Phaenna. An heroum was erected to him in the neighbourhood of Therapne.Lacedaemon. Of the traditional iron money of Sparta no specimens have come down to us, nor indeed is there any money of any metal known to have been struck at Sparta until the third century BC, the earliest coins being tetradrachms and drachms copied from those of Alexander the Great, but reading King Areus (??S????S ????S). Apollo, one of Zeus's many children and twin of Artemis, was born of Leto. Usually portrayed as a youth of great beauty, often with very effeminate features; on some coins he can be mistaken as female, but one should not be misled by this. He was a powerful god of great strength and prowess, once having fought Herakles on an equal footing.
   21 tetradrachms of this type, of which 18 were in museums and 2 were last seen before World War I.

King Areus This is a mirror image of actual coin. 310-266BC
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   Click to return from whence you came! Greek Tetradrachm from Sparta 310-266BC ~ King Areus and God Apollo

Obv: Click camera to see this specimen.This is a mirror image of actual coin. Head of king Areus diademed.
Rev: Click camera to see this specimen. Archaic agalma of the Apollo of Amyclae helmeted, holding spear and bow, and adorned on the side with a laurete wreath. Beside the statue, a goat. Greek initials ?-? stand for Lacedaemon.
Date: 310-266BC
Specs: 2.5cm ~ 17grams ~ Silver .999
   Lacedaemon. Of the traditional iron money of Sparta no specimens have come down to us, nor indeed is there any money of any metal known to have been struck at Sparta until the third century BC, the earliest coins being tetradrachms and drachms copied from those of Alexander the Great, but reading King Areus (??S????S ????S). Apollo, one of Zeus's many children and twin of Artemis, was born of Leto. Usually portrayed as a youth of great beauty, often with very effeminate features; on some coins he can be mistaken as female, but one should not be misled by this. He was a powerful god of great strength and prowess, once having fought Herakles on an equal footing.

Poseidon 277-239BC
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   Click to return from whence you came! Greek Tetradrachm 277-239BC ~ Macedonian Antigonous King

Obv: Click camera to see this specimen. Head of Poseidon, with flowing locks bound with marine plant.
Rev: Click camera to see this specimen. Naked Apollo seated left on a trireme prow holding (or examining) a bow. The word "??S???OS" (Vasileos) meaning "King's" inscribed under Apollo's figure.
Date: 277-239BC
Specs: 2.8cm ~ 17grams ~ Silver .999
   This coin belongs to the later Antigonus Doson. He was the king of Macedonia between 229-220BC. He bravely fought against the barbarians and in 223BC he was recognised as ruler of the aegean sea. He died in Macedonia in 220BC from bleeding due to his hardship. The reverse type is still capable of explanation as containing an allusion to the fortunate naval expedition which Antigonus Doson undertook in 228BC against Caria. Some claim that this type of tetradrachm refers clearly to a naval victory. The victory recorded is that of Gonatas over the Egyptian fleet off the island of Cos, circ. 253BC.

Helios 230-205BC
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   Click to return from whence you came! Greek Tetradrachm from Rhodes (Caria) 230-205BC

Obv: Click camera to see this specimen. Radiate head of Helios facing slightly right.
Rev: Click camera to see this specimen. Rose with bud to right,all in dotted circle.Greek initials "??????" (RODION) on top.
Date: 230-205BC
Specs: 2.6cm ~ 17grams ~ Silver .999
   The island was inhabited in the Neolithic period, although little remains of this culture. In the 16th century BC the Minoans came to Rhodes, and later Greek mythography recalled a Rhodian race they called the Telchines, and associated Rhodes with Danaus; it was sometimes nicknamed Telchinis. In the 15th century the Achaeans invaded. It was, however, in the 11th century that the island started to flourish, with the coming of the Dorians. It was the Dorians who later built the three important cities of Lindos, Ialyssos and Kameiros, which together with Kos, Cnidus and Halicarnassus (on the mainland) made up the so-called Dorian Hexapolis. In Pindar's ode, the island was said to be born of the union of Helios the sun god and the nymph Rhode, and the cities were named for their three sons. The rhoda is a pink hibiscus native to the island.
   The island of Rhodes is almost the only place where Helios enjoys an important cult, instancing a spectacular rite in which a quadriga, a chariot drawn by four horses, is driven over a precipice into the sea, with its overtones of the plight of Phaethon noted. There annual gymnastic tournaments were held in his honor. The Colossus of Rhodes was dedicated to him. He also had a significant cult on the acropolis of Corinth on the Greek mainland.

Webpage last updated:   Thursday, November 2, 2006